Doug Higgins

Looking at flight delays can be miserable

February 5th, 2014 at 2:06 am by under Weather

A strong winter storm is hitting the east coast.  I was curious what airports were impacted, so I went to the Federal Aviation Administration web site.  At 11:15 am their map of major northeast airports had just Philadelphia with delays.  PHL’s delays were averaging one hour and fifteen minutes.  I found this very surprising; just one airport having problems as the northeast was getting pounded with rain, snow, and ice.

Compare the FAA website to Flightaware’s Misery map.  The major New York airports (Newark, John F. Kennedy, and LaGuardia) had 16 delays and 71 cancellations.  I would consider that a big problem.   The misery index rotated around a full 270 degrees, that’s pretty high!  If you’re looking at flight information this this a great site to go.

Obviously check your airline for specific information on your exact flight.   But if you find yourself delayed, flightaware.com will let you know how miserable you should be.

travel delaysFlightaware2


February outlook has more of the same

February 1st, 2014 at 9:32 am by under Weather

The Climate Prediction Center Issued an updated February outlook.  Temperatures are expected to stay below normal in Wisconsin.

What is normal you ask?  The normal high temperature on Feb. 1st is 25 degrees in Green Bay; by the end of the month the normal high warms to 33 degrees.

There is not much information on precipitation as the CPC has Wisconsin under an “EC” or equal chance of above or below normal precipitation.

The 8-14 day outlook has better information with Wisconsin expecting above normal precipitation; so don’t put away your shovels yet.  FebtempsFebprecip

 

 


January cold but not a record breaker

January 31st, 2014 at 11:02 am by under Weather

The average temperature in January for Green Bay was just 8.7 degrees.  That ranks as the 17th coldest January on record, and the 3rd coldest in the last 30 years!

The warmest temperature was 39°; and the coldest was a bone chilling -21°.

We had 19 days where the temperature dipped below zero!

Snowfall was 4.4″ above normal, with an even 17″ falling.

Here are the top 3 coldest Januaries in Green Bay:

#1. 1921…… Average temperature -1.1°

#2. 1977….. Average temperature 3.1°

#3 1888….. Average temperature 5.2°

 

 


Some relief from the cold in February

January 30th, 2014 at 10:50 am by under Weather

Our average high temperature warms from 25 degrees to 33 by the end of the month.  I know, that doesn’t exactly make my frozen toes feel any warmer.

If temperatures did warm up in February, how warm can it get?

The highest temperature for first 10 days of the month is 56° set in 1925.

From the 11th to the 20th the highest temperature on record is 58° set in 1999.

From the 21st through leap year the highest temperature recorded (and the highest temperature ever in February) is 61° set in 2000.

So when can we expect our first big thaw?  It’s not in the 7-Day forecast or the 8-14 day forecast.  Beyond that, we can only wait and see.   Feb1

FebRecHi

 

 

 


Ingredients are here for severe storms later today

May 31st, 2013 at 10:09 am by under Weather

 blog1Severe_Setup

There is a slight risk (area in yellow) for severe storms from Green Bay, through the Fox Cities, and into Southern Wisconsin.  The primary threat from storms today will be large hail and damaging winds.

Scattered thunderstorms will develop early this afternoon (1pm) in Southwest Wisconsin.  These storms will race north into parts of NE Wisconsin today. 

The ingredients for severe weather include a strong jet stream and warm air at 4 thousand feet moving from Iowa into Wisconsin.  The jet and warm air will cause lift creating the storms.

The storm will also feed off of high humidity that is located on top of us.  We just need more sunshine to warm the air for the atmosphere to become conducive for severe storms. 

The Fox11 weather team will keep a close eye on our skies today, stay tuned!

 


Updated Marathon Forecast

May 18th, 2013 at 6:28 am by under Weather

Marathon

We’ll see partly sunny skies to start the marathon and half marathon Sunday but skies will become mostly sunny with winds out of south and southeast at 10-15 mph. 

If you’re taking part in the 5K on today at 8:30, expect mostly cloudy skies and 54 degrees with southeast winds at 10 mph. We’ll keep you updated and Good Luck!


Drowning danger high for area rivers

April 19th, 2013 at 9:24 am by under Weather

The threat for drowning is high with rivers running fast and cold across NE Wisconsin.  Remind your children to stay away from these rivers; they are not a good place to play.

Precipitation amounts will be light Friday, and dry Saturday and the first half of Sunday.  This is good news as we won’t add much runoff to area rivers, so don’t expect any big changes in water levels through the weekend. 

Half of the rivers in NE Wisconsin are below flood stage, the other half are near their banks.  The Fox River in Berlin is the only one reported in flood stage.  The Fox River in Berlin is expected to rise slightly today before slowly falling Monday

Fox River Berlin


Snowstorm headed for the Great Lakes Thursday

December 16th, 2012 at 10:24 am by under Weather

While it’s still may days away, weather forecasting tools called computer models are indicating a big storm for the Great Lakes this Thursday.  The storm will have abundant moisture, a strong low pressure system, and lots of wind.  These conditions along with cold air on the back side of the storm will produce large amounts of snow. 

If the storms stay on track  parts of Wisconsin could see 8 to 12 inches of snow.  Heavy snow would have a major impact on holiday travelers by both car and air Thursday and Friday.

We are closely monitoring this potent storm so check back to Fox11online.com and Fox 11 News for the latest forecast.

The maps below show the position of Blizzard Allison on the left, and the forecast for Thursday’s storm on the right.  While not quite as strong or large as Allison, Thursday’s storm has the eastern half of Wisconsin under the sweet spot for heaviest possible snowfall!       

 


It’s official, I’m one of those crazy dog people

November 9th, 2012 at 11:56 am by under Uncategorized, Weather

Yes, I can now be grouped in with the “crazy dog” people.  Phoebe, our Pembroke Welsh Corgi just turned 1 year old.  My step daughter Sarah made her a doggie birthday cake (mostly peanut butter and carrots).  My wife added the party hat, while I was happily snapping pictures the entire time. 

  I’ve been a dog enthusiast from way back.  But when my Labrador Retriever passed I tried going without a dog.  I thought that some new carpeting would be nice.  No dog hair would mean a cleaner house, and I’d save money on dog sitters.  Looking back now those were some silly ideas.  2 weeks of being dog-less and I was suffering from “empty nest syndrome”, or as my wife simply put it I was “freaking out”.  I really missed the pitter patter of paws, the sloppy kisses, the constantly wagging tail, even the fur that coated my work suits.  I found a home with no dog is a truly empty place.  Now my wife was not ready for another dog (she was still missing our Lab).  So I played dirtiest of tricks and emailed her a picture of a new litter of Corgi puppies.  My underhanded email worked and the next day we were in agreement, we are getting a puppy!

  We visited Phoebe and the rest of the puppies once a week as they grew from gerbil looking things into miniature Corgi’s.  At around 6 weeks the puppies ears started popping up into the traditional Corgi pose ^ ^ and we were so proud of our little pup.  New Year’s Day is when our family became complete again and Phoebe came home.  It’s been a doggie love affair ever since.

  Phoebe (aka “The Phoeb’s”…. aka “Fuzzy Butt”….. aka “Big Ears” aka….. aka “My Little Girl”) is a smart dog and loves her toys and chewing the stuffing out of them.  Tug-of-war is a game she always wants to play, and when she does, she makes a most ferocious growl.  I think it’s her way of acting bigger than the 18 pounds she sports.  But her favorite activity of all is catching Frisbees.  She can’t jump very high but she is quite a speedster and catches most of the disks thrown her way.   Although Phoebe like us a lot, I’ve noticed a disturbing trend lately, she seems lonely.  I think she needs a little brother or sister to keep her company.  It may be time to reach into my bag of tricks and email some puppy pictures to Carol.  When it comes to dogs I don’t fight fair.  ;-)

  If you are looking for some companionship I highly recommend dogs, though cats are nice too.  This link Petfinder.com will help you search for you perfect pup or kitty from shelters across Wisconsin and the U.S.  If you have not had an animal before I encourage you to go to a shelter and ask lots of question about what you need to do as an owner.  If a dog fits into your life I highly recommend getting one.  There are a lot brown eyed fuzzy wiggle butts waiting for a forever home!    


Why is Sandy being called a “Super Storm”?

October 27th, 2012 at 11:19 am by under Weather

Why is Sandy being called a “Super Storm”?  Well, it’s certainly not for its wind speeds.  Forecasters use the Saffir Simpson scale as a measure of hurricane winds.  The scale starts at a Category 1 storm with winds of 74 mph increasing to a Category 5 storm with winds of greater than 156 mph.  As of 10 am Saturday Sandy is just barely a Category 1 storm with winds of 74 mph.  The forecast has winds continuing in the 70 mph range as it makes landfall sometime Monday night or Tuesday morning.

 

The factor that makes this storm super is its size.  By merging with a winter storm Sandy will affect the entire eastern seaboard.  Many large cities will be at a virtual standstill as long as the storm continues to blow.  Here are the 4 main factors that will make this storm one for the history books:

 

  1. Coastal Flooding.  Costal areas of Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, and New York will be affected by storm surge, now forecast at 4-8 feet.
  2.  Power Outages:  High winds will be widespread across New England.  Winds will average 50 mph with gusts over 70 mph- this will break tree limbs and take down power lines.  The scale of this event (roughly from Vermont to Virginia) will keep some people in the dark for a number of days, maybe even a week.
  3. Heavy Mountain Snow:  Moisture, cold air, and this powerful storm will combine to dump 1-2 feet of snow in high elevations.  Virginia, West Virginia, and Pennsylvania will be hardest hit.  Besides affecting travel this heavy wet snow will down trees and power lines creating more power outages. 
  4. Flooding Rainfall:  The leading edge of Sandy will produce heavy flooding rainfall with 4-6” of rain forecast with isolated 8” amounts possible.  Flooding could stretch from Virginia to Vermont.

 

The path and strength of Sandy will continue to challenge forecasters, so go to the National Hurricane Center for the latest storm track.  This site from the National Weather Service in Virginia is also very handy for information on Sandy.  Click here for flight delays; there will be a lot of them starting Sunday night!